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CONFERENCE

SCHEDULE

A schedule for SMUN 2016 will be ready to view nearer the time, however don’t hesitate to check out last year’s (2015) schedule below, as an example of how and when our conferences usually take place.

Thursday 10th November

16:00 - 18:00

Delegate Registrations

Atrium

18:00 - 19:00

Opening Cermony

Auditorium

21:00 - 03:00

Welcome Mingle

Sturecompagniet

Friday 11th November

10:30 - 11:00

Delegate Assembly

Atrium

11:00 - 12:00

Ambassador Lapouge Lunch

Rotunda & Pub

12:00 - 13:00

"Effective Negotiating" - Workshop by Rima-Maria Rahal

Rotunda & Pub

13:00 - 14:00

"A Social and International Order in which Human Rights can be Fully Realized" - Lecture by Mr. Pål Wrange

Rotunda & Pub

14:00 - 14:15

Fika*

Pub

14:15 - 15:00

"SMUN Rules of Procedure" - Workshop by Secretary-General César Gimeno 

Rotunda & Pub

15:00 - 18:00

Committee Sessions I

Committee Rooms

Saturday 12th November

08:30 - 09:00

Morning Fika Mingle

Pub

09:00 - 12:00

Committee Sessions II

Committ

12:00 - 12:15

Official Committee Photo Sessions

Atrium

12:15 - 13:00

Lunch

Rotunda & Pub

13:00 - 15:00

Committee Sessions III

Committee Rooms

15:00 - 15:30

Fika*

Rotunda & Pub

Sunday 13th November

08:30 - 09:00

Morning Fika Mingle

Pub

09:00 - 12:00

Committee Sessions V

Committee Rooms

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch

Rotunda & Pub

13:00 - 15:30

Committee Sessions VI

Committee Rooms

15:30 - 16:00

Certificates & Adwards

Committee Rooms

10:30 - 11:00

Closing Ceremony

Auditorium

15:30 - 18:00

Committee Sessions IV

Committee Rooms

22:00 - 03:00

Stockholm by Night

Café Opera

20:00 - 24:00

Diplomat Diner

Maison Pierre

*Fika schedules are flexible and will vary for every committee

COMMITTEES

Committees give you, the delegate, the time and driection needed to focus on the key issues affecting out world today. Our aim for this year, is to create dynamic committees and involve new topics which target very real aspects of international politics and how we work together within the international community.


We will soon update you with more information on the committees for SMUN 2016, but for now, you can find out what we discussed last year below!

Press here!

 

SPEAKERS

At Stockholm Model United Nations, we are aways striving to invite the most promintent people, from relevant fields, to give you the opportunity to get up close and personal to real life international politics and relations. Stay tuned as we continually update our line-up for SMUN 2016! Here you can find our fantastic speakers from last year.

HANS CORELL

Hans Corell served as Under-Secretary-General for Legal Affairs and the Legal Counsel of the United Nations from 1994-2004. In this capacity, he was head of the Office of Legal Affairs in the United Nations Secretariat. Before joining the United Nations, he was Ambassador and Under-Secretary for Legal and Consular Affairs in the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 1984 to 1994.

Since his retirement from public service in 2004, Mr. Corell is engaged in many different activities, including serving as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at Lund University from 2006-2012.

Linda Nordin is currently serving as the Secretary General of the United Nations Association of Sweden. With a strong background in international relations, Ms. Nordin has worked with election monitoring in Armenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, assisted with the Swedish Agency for Civil Emergency Planning, and also worked as a regional coordinator for the Swedish Red Cross. She also organises regular training on women’s rights, mine clearing, and lectures on issues of peace and security.

LINDA NORDIN

JACQUES LAPOUGE

Currently serving as French Ambassador to Sweden, Mr Lapouge has a long history in the diplomatic world. He has previously been posted in Addis-Ababa, Paris, Tokyo, and even a mission to the United Nations.

In 1999, Mr Lapouge became European advisor to the President of the Republic, and then Ambassador to Malaysia from 2002 to 2005. He returned to Paris in 2005 as Director for Economic and Financial Affairs and was appointed in 2007 as Diplomatic Advisor to the Prime Minister.

Under-Secretary General: Aleksandar Jerinkic

Difficulty Level: Advanced

Representation: 2 Delegates per country

Topic 1: Civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Topic 2: Rising sea levels in Palau

Topic 3: Smallpox outbreak

Topic 4: Risks posed by cybertechnology

Topic 5: Territorial disputes between China and its neighbors over sea boundaries

Topic 1: Civil War in the Democratic Republic of Congo

The Democratic Republic of Congo has had very few completely peaceful spells since the end of the Cold War. Once seen as a staunch bulwark against Communism and therefore supported by the US regardless of its human rights record or its kleptocratic reputation, the country has near-collapsed since. While the M23 rebellion in the east was covered mostly by the news in 2012-13, this is not the only member of armed insurrection in the DRC. Apart from the M23 (which have been quelled for the moment), eastern DRC is the base for the Lord’s Resistance Army, which still raids bordering countries. The region also hosts the FDLR (mostly Hutu Rwandan rebels), as well as the Rai Mutomboki (an anti-FDLR group). The FRPI (an Ituri group), is in the extreme north-east, as well as the ADF-NALU (Ugandan-led Islamists), while the south-east of the DRC is has several Mai Mai groupings and the FDLR (with some Rai Mutomboki). One should also not forget the plethora of ‘other’ armed groups which are not big or distinguishable enough, but holds positions in between all the factions listed above. In a region rich with mineral wealth, it is not surprising that these groups have been able to continue their operations.

Topic 2: Rising Sea Levels in Palau

The country of Palau resides in the Pacific Ocean between the Philippines, Federated States of Micronesia and Indonesia. Palau already has insufficient fresh water and agriculture in order to feed its own population. Therefore, the rising sea levels and the potential flooding of the low-lying areas is a grave threat, as this occurrence would mean that what little agriculture there is would be wiped out and that some of the fresh water sources could be submerged. Furthermore, the mangroves of Palau are a natural habitat for the saltwater crocodiles, which are considered very dangerous and can grow up to 4.5 meters. The country does lie outside the main typhoon zone, but while rare, typhoons can hit the islands. In 2013, it was hit by typhoon Haiyan, luckily without fatalities and with minor damage. However, with climate change and unusual weather patterns, there is a distinct possibility that this could change, leading to many more typhoons hitting the islands.

 

Topic 3: Smallpox Outbreak

Smallpox is the first virus to be fully exterminated in the wild by human action (second and last being rinderpest). The disease used to be very close to a death sentence, but since 1979, the world has been declared as smallpox-free. The last major outbreaks were in 1972 (Yugoslavia) and 1975 (Somalia and Ethiopia). This means that no one has been exposed to the naturally-occurring Variola viruses since 1977 (Bangladesh) and that no one has immunity to it. In 1971, there was a contained outbreak of Soviet weaponized smallpox in the Aral Sea, but without any civilian casualties. The only known samples still exists in US and Russia, which have repeatedly delayed the action to destroy the specimens and any of their products, despite the WHO recommendation dating back to 1986. However, as recently as 2004 and 2014, specimens have been found in non-secured facilities, meaning that with enough research and luck, anyone can obtain a sample of smallpox. With the modern medicine enabling the potential insertion of smallpox genes into other pox viruses, the possibilities for re-infection are endless.

 

Topic 4: Risks posed by cybertechnology

The use of cybertechnology in warfare can be (openly) traced back to 1999. Although this was the crudest form of cyber warfare (website crashing etc.), it showed that the Internet could be harnessed to at least embarrass and worst compromise communications. Since then, we have seen the rise of viruses such as Duqu, mass-surveillance programs (including heads of state) and the increasing automatisation of weapons. The future of warfare is here and its battle cries are in 1s and 0s. Some of the ethical questions raised by the rise of technological warfare include the ability to control the weapons and the culpability of operators. For instance, a self-replicating virus which would infect an installation would also affect civilian infrastructure without discriminating. Furthermore, there are questions as to the effectiveness of some of the heavy reliance on high-tech warfare when fighting in non-Clausewitz wars (see Millennium Challenge 2002).

 

Topic 5: Territorial disputes between China and its neighbors over sea boundaries

The elephant in the room is the People’s Republic of China. And it is a really big one. The PRC has running territorial disputes with all the countries anywhere near it sea borders (and some which are relatively far away). Some of the islands in South China Sea have been a part of China since at least 1883 and were recognized as such in international treaties, but with problems arising after the San Francisco Peace Treaty, as well as opportunistic territory-claims, the row in the South China Sea is a continuous row since the end of WW2. If the PRC’s claims were recognized, it would be in effective control of all traffic coming through the South China Sea from the Indian Ocean and Australia. In the East China Sea, there were no active issues until 1995 (although PRC and Japan did have a disagreement over their exclusive economic zones), when the PRC discovered significant gas reserves and began exploitation. This compounds the existing row over the ownership of islands in the East China Sea, as well as a discontent the PRC expressed over a South Korean research station built on a reef both countries claim.